Posts Tagged ‘google’

The Walled Garden

June 24, 2011

In the latest Tech chat from Serotalk, Mike Calvo expressed an annoyance for the “walled garden”.

Here is what I have to say about it.

Android 2.1 2.2 and 2.3 were frangmented. What’s fragmented mean? Well it means that the OS source code was given out by google and then developers were able to do whatever they wanted to it. Google decided in HoneyComb the latest verson of the android software to keep the OS closed. People were up in arms about this and it made all the major tech blogs around the net. No more source code or very little would be let out. This isn’t a bad thing Google relized to have a good operating system they needed to make some people made and take control of their operating system. Much in the way Apple does with IOS and MAC OSX. This isn’t a bad thing to me, because the OS isn’t be fragmented anymore and updates can be pushed across all devices not just devices the carrier and developer decide to push out updates too. It also makes it easier for blind people to use it because there are not all of these inaccessible skins over the OS. So, that means that it can be made more accessible which is good and great!

What do you think?

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Android vs. iPhone

May 14, 2011

After about a whole week to look at my friend’s android powerd device, I’ve got a lot of things to say about it. First of all it’s not like the iPhone so don’t expect to have everything done for you. Also don’t expect for your android phone to automatically get updates. Many different carriers are now sporting android devices with verizon being number one in this space. But, as far as accessibility goes there’s a big difference. One of the biggest things I noticed is that the android platform is not as intuitive as the iPhone. What I mean by this is you know that on the iPhone you can take four fingers and hit the top of the screen and that will take you to the top of your window. On any android device that’s not the case. Also when you are on an item on the iPhone you can double tap anywhere and the iPhone will preform that action. Android doesn’t allow for this which was one of the hardest things for me to master. E-mail and web browsing on the iPhone are great experiences to say the least. Not so on the android devices, browsing the web and e-mailing are not capable well at least web browsing. To get a good browsing and e-mail experience you have to buy a seperate application that is a screen reader and a suite of mobile applications, which is $79. To me it was very expensive when the iPhone already has this feature built in. There is a screen reader that you can purchase for free, it works great but it’s not as good as the iPhone screen reader. The build quality of the device I got to look at was a good build with a slide out keyboard. I really liked this feature and wish that it would come as an option with the iPhone, although the on screen keyboard does an excellent job for short text messages and short emails. If you need to do a lot of typing for emails and taking notes possibly, you’ll want to get a better keyboard. Maybe even a Bluetooth keyboard from apple or even a third party one. The notification system was awesome. It’s not as noisy as the ios notification system. Overall, I enjoy my iPhone and prefer it over any android device. There has to be a lot more done with an android device. It’s just not for me. I’m not saying that the android platform is bad it’s just not for me. I would suggest that if you are in the market for a new phone check both android and iPhone out. They are good alternatives if you are looking for a new phone.

Google Chrome

May 13, 2011

I just downloaded Google’s so called fast browser. I’ve only had it for a few minutes but I wanted to give my take on it. Boy is it fast. I really enjoy it. I really do. As a legally blind person using a mixture of screen reading technology and magnification I find that the magnification works really well. I use Zoomtext from AI Squared and it works perfectly whether I’m using Firefox, IE, or Chrome. I also use JAWS. JAWS is a screen reading program that converts what a sighted person would see into synthesized speech. Unfortunately JAWS doesn’t work with Chrome. However, a free screen reader called NVDA (Non Visual Desktop Access) quite ironically works. Why is that? I have no idea but, it does. There are some problems however that present themselves when using NVDA with Chrome. When going on to youtube.com and hitting (b) for button the screen reader won’t read the labels on the buttons. This is quite annoying to say the least. But, overall it’s a fast browser and I enjoy it.


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